Community Conservation Leadership (G10-12)

Debating conservation

In this program students will develop skills to explore and critically analyse ideas in the creation of positive community conservation strategies. Students will have a chance to find out what projects the Calgary Zoo is currently looking into and to debate how they would develop the project before discovering how the experts are going about it. We will use an award-winning example of community-based conservation, the Wechiau Hippo Sanctuary, as a model. Click HERE for a more detailed outline of the program.

Community Conservation Leadership

Curriculum Connections:

ELA

  • Select appropriate strategies to extend awareness and understanding of new perspectives, monitor their effectiveness, and modify them as needed.
  • Explain how the choices and motives of characters and people presented in texts may provide insight into the choices and motives of self and others.

Social Studies

  • Develop strategies to demonstrate active, responsible global citizenship.
  • Acknowledge and appreciate the existence of multiple perspectives in a globalizing world.
  • Appreciate that nations and states pursue national interest.
  • Exhibit a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and world issues.
  • Explore the relationship between personal and collective worldviews and ideology.

 Length: 5 Hours (includes 1 hour lunch break)

Time offered: 9.30am-2.30pm (Please let us know if you need an altered start or finish time)
Maximum 1 per day

Program Fee: $350

Availability: September - April

Maximum 37 students

For detailed availabilty please check the Program Schedule

Booking information and guidelines

Please look through our booking procedures to help you fill in a booking form. It includes important information relating to class sizes and chaperones as well as other frequently asked questions.


Download booking form

Download Booking Form

The rhinoceros is generally non-social, although they will sometimes gather together to wallow in shallow ponds or streams. A group is called a crash.